Film Screenings
Film Screenings

Film Screenings

DATE

27 Nov (Sat) - 27 Nov (Sat)
28 Nov (Sun) - 28 Nov (Sun)

Calendar Google Cal

TIME

Saturday, 14:30 - 14:30, 16:30 - 16:30, 18:30 - 18:30, 20:30 - 20:30

Sunday, 14:30 - 14:30, 16:30 - 16:30, 18:30 - 18:30, 20:30 - 20:30

Sunday, 14:30 - 14:30, 16:30 - 16:30, 18:30 - 18:30, 20:30 - 20:30

Saturday, 14:30 - 14:30, 16:30 - 16:30, 18:30 - 18:30, 20:30 - 20:30

PRICE

BUY TICKETS Priority Booking for Esplanade&Me members 11 Oct 2021, Mon, 12pm Public Booking 12 Oct 2021, Tue, 9am onwards $5 per film For Esplanade&Me Members only Not a member? Great arts experiences start with Esplanade&Me Discover, a free membership for everyone. Sign up More details +

LOCATION

Esplanade. Esplanade Annexe Studio

#Family#Music

For the Love of a Man – Rajnikanth Documentary (NC16)

Rinku Kalsy (India)

27 & 28 Nov 2021, Sat & Sun, 2.30pm & 8.30pm
Details

Duration: 1hr 30mins | Performed in Tamil with English subtitles
For the Love of a Man follows the fans of superstar Rajnikanth, whose fandom often becomes integral to their identities and those of people around them. The visual ethic of fandom and star mimicry reveal a form of star worship that is unique to Indian cinema culture. The lives of fans and their families present to us themes of brotherhood, aspiration, political affiliation, or even just means of being noticed. From bankruptcies to reformations from lives of crime, the lives of the fans offer stories that range from the heroic to the horrific—all in a day’s work in turning a film star into a deity. For the Love of a Man premiered at the Venice Film Festival in September 2015 and showed at the Mumbai and Dubai Film Festivals in 2015.

Koothu

Sandhya Kumar (India)

27 Nov 2021, Sat, 4.30pm
Details

Duration: 52mins | Performed in Tamil and English with English subtitles.
In many villages in Tamil Nadu, a theatre tradition continues to link people with the past. Closely connected with religion and caste rituals, koothu brings to life stories about gods, demigods, kings and demons from the Indian epics. A typical performance runs all –night, and performers wear elaborate make-up, costumes and wooden ornaments while simultaneously singing, dancing and acting on stage. Koothu companies tour the countryside, often commissioned by villages to perform for several consecutive nights. Yet, despite its enduring rural popularity, koothu struggles to find place and patronage in urban art circles, partly due to its associations with the lower castes. Who creates the binaries of folk and classical? Through the work of two koothu masters, P. Rajagopal and Sambandan Thambiran, the film delves into questions of representation and patronage of the art form while presenting its art and aesthetics.
The screening is co-curated with IFA, an independent, nationwide, not-for-profit organisation that makes grants and implements projects under practice, research and education in the arts and culture in India.

The Nine Months

Merajur Rahman Baruah (India)

27 Nov 2021, Sat, 6.30pm
Details

Duration: 1hr 17mins | Performed in Assamese with English subtitles.
This evocative film explores the history, form, style and aesthetics of Assam’s mobile theatre. It records the transformation in themes and repertoires in the genre of performance, as well as captures the experiences and perspectives of its promoters, directors, actors, technicians, and stagehands while documenting the impact of globalisation on its practice. Take a look at the various kinds of plays staged by the mobile theatre, the issues the community deals with and how the genre has transformed from presenting mythological and folk stories to contemporary themes with social and political implications.
This film and its screening were made possible with support from India Foundation for the Arts (IFA), an independent not-for-profit organisation that awards grants and implements projects under practice, research and education in the arts and culture in India.

Out of Thin Air

Shabani Hassanwalia and Samreen Farooqi (India)

28 Nov 2021, Sun, 4.30pm
Details

Duration: 50mins | Performed in Tamil and English with English subtitles.
Out of Thin Air is the story of one of the most surreal and hostile landscapes in the world—Ladakh. See beyond the postcard-perfect images and follow the subterranean film movement that has taken root in the region over the past six years, becoming the voice of the people. Today, taxi drivers, grocery store owners, cops and monks are producers, directors, camerapersons and actors of one of the youngest and most dynamic, local film industries in the world.
This film and its screening were made possible with support from India Foundation for the Arts (IFA), an independent not-for-profit organisation that awards grants and implements projects under practice, research and education in the arts and culture in India.

Casting Music

Ashok Maridas (India)

28 Nov 2021, Sun, 6.30pm
Details

Duration: 46mins | Performed in Kannada & Telugu with subtitles in English
A film on the Savita Samaja, a community of Nadaswaram players, their relation to music and social structures, the film seeks to unravel the predicaments and negotiations that are currently taking place within the community in response to a drastically changing social and cultural milieu.
About the work:
The IFA grant to Ashok Maridas enabled him to research into the struggles and transitions taking place within the community of Nadaswaram players, in relation to their music and social structures. Centered on the lives of three protagonists representing different generations, the film seeks to unravel the predicaments and negotiations that are currently taking place within the community in response to a drastically changing social and cultural milieu.
The Nadaswaram, a double reed wind instrument in South India, has traditionally been played by lower caste communities. In the Tamil region, it was mostly male members of the devadasi community that excelled in playing this instrument. In Karnataka, the players of the instrument have mostly come from the hajaama or the barber community. Considered a very auspicious instrument, the Nadaswaram till about a decade ago, used to have a place of pride in most auspicious events in upper caste Hindu families, especially during weddings. However, over the years, with caste identities becoming more and more rigid, the Nadaswaram players continued to be marginalised to the extent that word Hajaama has today come to be used in a derogatory and abusive manner in reference to dalit communities.
Coupled with this social marginalisation, there has also been the gradual attrition of the use of the Nadaswaram itself, within the South Indian music context. The movement of music concerts from open spaces to the indoors, the coming of audio technology – especially microphones – and the hegemony of the human voice, have been a few of the many processes that have over the years, relegated the Nadaswaram to the margins. These processes have deeply dented the lives of the musicians in social, economic as well as artistic ways. The youth within the hajaama community is steadily withdrawing from their musical lineage. On the other hand, however, there is a rising political consciousness within the community that has been demanding a more dignified identity, through drive to rename themselves as the Savita Samaj instead of Hajaama. In the barber families that still keep their connections with their music, the urge is to replace the Nadaswaram with the saxophone, which is more ‘respectable’ since its western origins are not weighed down by the baggage of caste histories. It is these complex phenomena – the transitions, the negotiations and the struggles that are currently taking place within the community – which the film seeks to understand.
Ashok’s own tryst with the Nadaswaram players began accidentally several years ago. Amidst much of his commercial work, he had continued to build his relationship with members of the community. This gave him an opportunity to study their everyday lives closely. The IFA grant came to him at a very crucial juncture when the community is going through significant internal transitions. The film is an ‘active record’ of the dialogue between two generations of the Savita community.
The protagonists in the film hail from Bangalore and Venkatagirikota in Andhra Pradesh. They represent opposite, sometimes conflicting worldviews that are currently prevalent in the community. One protagonist, Murthy, is the voice of the youth that is getting disenchanted with their musical legacy. Using the instrument as a visual metaphor, the film will explore the socio-economic issues that are influencing the sweeping changes in the lives of the community members and the agony of their loss of a great open-air musical school. ‘Considering that there is very little in the mainstream discourse about the Savita community and its connections to the Nadaswaram, it is important to ensure that at no point the voices of the community is allowed to get lost’, Ashok says. While the Nadaswaram has been written about fairly extensively, there is almost nothing about the Savitas, their history, their current turmoil and their musical legacy. Without doubt, this film will significantly contribute to the existing discourse on the Nadaswaram in South India.

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